You are viewing the version of this documentation from Perl 5.37.4. This is a development release of Perl.

CONTENTS

NAME

feature - Perl pragma to enable new features

SYNOPSIS

use feature qw(fc say);

# Without the "use feature" above, this code would not be able to find
# the built-ins "say" or "fc":
say "The case-folded version of $x is: " . fc $x;


# set features to match the :5.36 bundle, which may turn off or on
# multiple features (see "FEATURE BUNDLES" below)
use feature ':5.36';


# implicitly loads :5.36 feature bundle
use v5.36;

DESCRIPTION

It is usually impossible to add new syntax to Perl without breaking some existing programs. This pragma provides a way to minimize that risk. New syntactic constructs, or new semantic meanings to older constructs, can be enabled by use feature 'foo', and will be parsed only when the appropriate feature pragma is in scope. (Nevertheless, the CORE:: prefix provides access to all Perl keywords, regardless of this pragma.)

Lexical effect

Like other pragmas (use strict, for example), features have a lexical effect. use feature qw(foo) will only make the feature "foo" available from that point to the end of the enclosing block.

{
    use feature 'say';
    say "say is available here";
}
print "But not here.\n";

no feature

Features can also be turned off by using no feature "foo". This too has lexical effect.

use feature 'say';
say "say is available here";
{
    no feature 'say';
    print "But not here.\n";
}
say "Yet it is here.";

no feature with no features specified will reset to the default group. To disable all features (an unusual request!) use no feature ':all'.

AVAILABLE FEATURES

Read "FEATURE BUNDLES" for the feature cheat sheet summary.

The 'say' feature

use feature 'say' tells the compiler to enable the Raku-inspired say function.

See "say" in perlfunc for details.

This feature is available starting with Perl 5.10.

The 'state' feature

use feature 'state' tells the compiler to enable state variables.

See "Persistent Private Variables" in perlsub for details.

This feature is available starting with Perl 5.10.

The 'switch' feature

WARNING: This feature is still experimental and the implementation may change or be removed in future versions of Perl. For this reason, Perl will warn when you use the feature, unless you have explicitly disabled the warning:

no warnings "experimental::smartmatch";

use feature 'switch' tells the compiler to enable the Raku given/when construct.

See "Switch Statements" in perlsyn for details.

This feature is available starting with Perl 5.10.

The 'unicode_strings' feature

use feature 'unicode_strings' tells the compiler to use Unicode rules in all string operations executed within its scope (unless they are also within the scope of either use locale or use bytes). The same applies to all regular expressions compiled within the scope, even if executed outside it. It does not change the internal representation of strings, but only how they are interpreted.

no feature 'unicode_strings' tells the compiler to use the traditional Perl rules wherein the native character set rules is used unless it is clear to Perl that Unicode is desired. This can lead to some surprises when the behavior suddenly changes. (See "The "Unicode Bug"" in perlunicode for details.) For this reason, if you are potentially using Unicode in your program, the use feature 'unicode_strings' subpragma is strongly recommended.

This feature is available starting with Perl 5.12; was almost fully implemented in Perl 5.14; and extended in Perl 5.16 to cover quotemeta; was extended further in Perl 5.26 to cover the range operator; and was extended again in Perl 5.28 to cover special-cased whitespace splitting.

The 'unicode_eval' and 'evalbytes' features

Together, these two features are intended to replace the legacy string eval function, which behaves problematically in some instances. They are available starting with Perl 5.16, and are enabled by default by a use 5.16 or higher declaration.

unicode_eval changes the behavior of plain string eval to work more consistently, especially in the Unicode world. Certain (mis)behaviors couldn't be changed without breaking some things that had come to rely on them, so the feature can be enabled and disabled. Details are at "Under the "unicode_eval" feature" in perlfunc.

evalbytes is like string eval, but it treats its argument as a byte string. Details are at "evalbytes EXPR" in perlfunc. Without a use feature 'evalbytes' nor a use v5.16 (or higher) declaration in the current scope, you can still access it by instead writing CORE::evalbytes.

The 'current_sub' feature

This provides the __SUB__ token that returns a reference to the current subroutine or undef outside of a subroutine.

This feature is available starting with Perl 5.16.

The 'array_base' feature

This feature supported the legacy $[ variable. See "$[" in perlvar. It was on by default but disabled under use v5.16 (see "IMPLICIT LOADING", below) and unavailable since perl 5.30.

This feature is available under this name starting with Perl 5.16. In previous versions, it was simply on all the time, and this pragma knew nothing about it.

The 'fc' feature

use feature 'fc' tells the compiler to enable the fc function, which implements Unicode casefolding.

See "fc" in perlfunc for details.

This feature is available from Perl 5.16 onwards.

The 'lexical_subs' feature

In Perl versions prior to 5.26, this feature enabled declaration of subroutines via my sub foo, state sub foo and our sub foo syntax. See "Lexical Subroutines" in perlsub for details.

This feature is available from Perl 5.18 onwards. From Perl 5.18 to 5.24, it was classed as experimental, and Perl emitted a warning for its usage, except when explicitly disabled:

no warnings "experimental::lexical_subs";

As of Perl 5.26, use of this feature no longer triggers a warning, though the experimental::lexical_subs warning category still exists (for compatibility with code that disables it). In addition, this syntax is not only no longer experimental, but it is enabled for all Perl code, regardless of what feature declarations are in scope.

The 'postderef' and 'postderef_qq' features

The 'postderef_qq' feature extends the applicability of postfix dereference syntax so that postfix array and scalar dereference are available in double-quotish interpolations. For example, it makes the following two statements equivalent:

my $s = "[@{ $h->{a} }]";
my $s = "[$h->{a}->@*]";

This feature is available from Perl 5.20 onwards. In Perl 5.20 and 5.22, it was classed as experimental, and Perl emitted a warning for its usage, except when explicitly disabled:

no warnings "experimental::postderef";

As of Perl 5.24, use of this feature no longer triggers a warning, though the experimental::postderef warning category still exists (for compatibility with code that disables it).

The 'postderef' feature was used in Perl 5.20 and Perl 5.22 to enable postfix dereference syntax outside double-quotish interpolations. In those versions, using it triggered the experimental::postderef warning in the same way as the 'postderef_qq' feature did. As of Perl 5.24, this syntax is not only no longer experimental, but it is enabled for all Perl code, regardless of what feature declarations are in scope.

The 'signatures' feature

This enables syntax for declaring subroutine arguments as lexical variables. For example, for this subroutine:

sub foo ($left, $right) {
    return $left + $right;
}

Calling foo(3, 7) will assign 3 into $left and 7 into $right.

See "Signatures" in perlsub for details.

This feature is available from Perl 5.20 onwards. From Perl 5.20 to 5.34, it was classed as experimental, and Perl emitted a warning for its usage, except when explicitly disabled:

no warnings "experimental::signatures";

As of Perl 5.36, use of this feature no longer triggers a warning, though the experimental::signatures warning category still exists (for compatibility with code that disables it). This feature is now considered stable, and is enabled automatically by use v5.36 (or higher).

The 'refaliasing' feature

WARNING: This feature is still experimental and the implementation may change or be removed in future versions of Perl. For this reason, Perl will warn when you use the feature, unless you have explicitly disabled the warning:

no warnings "experimental::refaliasing";

This enables aliasing via assignment to references:

\$a = \$b; # $a and $b now point to the same scalar
\@a = \@b; #                     to the same array
\%a = \%b;
\&a = \&b;
foreach \%hash (@array_of_hash_refs) {
    ...
}

See "Assigning to References" in perlref for details.

This feature is available from Perl 5.22 onwards.

The 'bitwise' feature

This makes the four standard bitwise operators (& | ^ ~) treat their operands consistently as numbers, and introduces four new dotted operators (&. |. ^. ~.) that treat their operands consistently as strings. The same applies to the assignment variants (&= |= ^= &.= |.= ^.=).

See "Bitwise String Operators" in perlop for details.

This feature is available from Perl 5.22 onwards. Starting in Perl 5.28, use v5.28 will enable the feature. Before 5.28, it was still experimental and would emit a warning in the "experimental::bitwise" category.

The 'declared_refs' feature

WARNING: This feature is still experimental and the implementation may change or be removed in future versions of Perl. For this reason, Perl will warn when you use the feature, unless you have explicitly disabled the warning:

no warnings "experimental::declared_refs";

This allows a reference to a variable to be declared with my, state, our our, or localized with local. It is intended mainly for use in conjunction with the "refaliasing" feature. See "Declaring a Reference to a Variable" in perlref for examples.

This feature is available from Perl 5.26 onwards.

The 'isa' feature

This allows the use of the isa infix operator, which tests whether the scalar given by the left operand is an object of the class given by the right operand. See "Class Instance Operator" in perlop for more details.

This feature is available from Perl 5.32 onwards. From Perl 5.32 to 5.34, it was classed as experimental, and Perl emitted a warning for its usage, except when explicitly disabled:

no warnings "experimental::isa";

As of Perl 5.36, use of this feature no longer triggers a warning (though the experimental::isa warning category stilll exists for compatibility with code that disables it). This feature is now considered stable, and is enabled automatically by use v5.36 (or higher).

The 'indirect' feature

This feature allows the use of indirect object syntax for method calls, e.g. new Foo 1, 2;. It is enabled by default, but can be turned off to disallow indirect object syntax.

This feature is available under this name from Perl 5.32 onwards. In previous versions, it was simply on all the time. To disallow (or warn on) indirect object syntax on older Perls, see the indirect CPAN module.

The 'multidimensional' feature

This feature enables multidimensional array emulation, a perl 4 (or earlier) feature that was used to emulate multidimensional arrays with hashes. This works by converting code like $foo{$x, $y} into $foo{join($;, $x, $y)}. It is enabled by default, but can be turned off to disable multidimensional array emulation.

When this feature is disabled the syntax that is normally replaced will report a compilation error.

This feature is available under this name from Perl 5.34 onwards. In previous versions, it was simply on all the time.

You can use the multidimensional module on CPAN to disable multidimensional array emulation for older versions of Perl.

The 'bareword_filehandles' feature

This feature enables bareword filehandles for builtin functions operations, a generally discouraged practice. It is enabled by default, but can be turned off to disable bareword filehandles, except for the exceptions listed below.

The perl built-in filehandles STDIN, STDOUT, STDERR, DATA, ARGV, ARGVOUT and the special _ are always enabled.

This feature is enabled under this name from Perl 5.34 onwards. In previous versions it was simply on all the time.

You can use the bareword::filehandles module on CPAN to disable bareword filehandles for older versions of perl.

The 'try' feature.

WARNING: This feature is still experimental and the implementation may change or be removed in future versions of Perl. For this reason, Perl will warn when you use the feature, unless you have explicitly disabled the warning:

no warnings "experimental::try";

This feature enables the try and catch syntax, which allows exception handling, where exceptions thrown from the body of the block introduced with try are caught by executing the body of the catch block.

For more information, see "Try Catch Exception Handling" in perlsyn.

The 'defer' feature

WARNING: This feature is still experimental and the implementation may change or be removed in future versions of Perl. For this reason, Perl will warn when you use the feature, unless you have explicitly disabled the warning:

no warnings "experimental::defer";

This feature enables the defer block syntax, which allows a block of code to be deferred until when the flow of control leaves the block which contained it. For more details, see "defer" in perlsyn.

The 'extra_paired_delimiters' feature

WARNING: This feature is still experimental and the implementation may change or be removed in future versions of Perl. For this reason, Perl will warn when you use the feature, unless you have explicitly disabled the warning:

no warnings "experimental::extra_paired_delimiters";

This feature enables the use of more paired string delimiters than the traditional four, < >, ( ), { }, and [ ]. When this feature is on, for example, you can say qr«pat».

As with any usage of non-ASCII delimiters in a UTF-8-encoded source file, you will want to ensure the parser will decode the source code from UTF-8 bytes with a declaration such as use utf8.

This feature is available starting in Perl 5.36.

The complete list of accepted paired delimiters as of Unicode 14.0 is:

(  )    U+0028, U+0029   LEFT/RIGHT PARENTHESIS
<  >    U+003C, U+003E   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN SIGN
[  ]    U+005B, U+005D   LEFT/RIGHT SQUARE BRACKET
{  }    U+007B, U+007D   LEFT/RIGHT CURLY BRACKET
«  »    U+00AB, U+00BB   LEFT/RIGHT-POINTING DOUBLE ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
»  «    U+00BB, U+00AB   RIGHT/LEFT-POINTING DOUBLE ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
܆  ܇    U+0706, U+0707   SYRIAC COLON SKEWED LEFT/RIGHT
༺  ༻    U+0F3A, U+0F3B   TIBETAN MARK GUG RTAGS GYON,  TIBETAN MARK GUG
                         RTAGS GYAS
༼  ༽    U+0F3C, U+0F3D   TIBETAN MARK ANG KHANG GYON,  TIBETAN MARK ANG
                         KHANG GYAS
᚛  ᚜    U+169B, U+169C   OGHAM FEATHER MARK,  OGHAM REVERSED FEATHER MARK
‘  ’    U+2018, U+2019   LEFT/RIGHT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK
’  ‘    U+2019, U+2018   RIGHT/LEFT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK
“  ”    U+201C, U+201D   LEFT/RIGHT DOUBLE QUOTATION MARK
”  “    U+201D, U+201C   RIGHT/LEFT DOUBLE QUOTATION MARK
‵  ′    U+2035, U+2032   REVERSED PRIME,  PRIME
‶  ″    U+2036, U+2033   REVERSED DOUBLE PRIME,  DOUBLE PRIME
‷  ‴    U+2037, U+2034   REVERSED TRIPLE PRIME,  TRIPLE PRIME
‹  ›    U+2039, U+203A   SINGLE LEFT/RIGHT-POINTING ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
›  ‹    U+203A, U+2039   SINGLE RIGHT/LEFT-POINTING ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
⁅  ⁆    U+2045, U+2046   LEFT/RIGHT SQUARE BRACKET WITH QUILL
⁍  ⁌    U+204D, U+204C   BLACK RIGHT/LEFTWARDS BULLET
⁽  ⁾    U+207D, U+207E   SUPERSCRIPT LEFT/RIGHT PARENTHESIS
₍  ₎    U+208D, U+208E   SUBSCRIPT LEFT/RIGHT PARENTHESIS
→  ←    U+2192, U+2190   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW
↛  ↚    U+219B, U+219A   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH STROKE
↝  ↜    U+219D, U+219C   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS WAVE ARROW
↠  ↞    U+21A0, U+219E   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TWO HEADED ARROW
↣  ↢    U+21A3, U+21A2   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH TAIL
↦  ↤    U+21A6, U+21A4   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW FROM BAR
↪  ↩    U+21AA, U+21A9   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH HOOK
↬  ↫    U+21AC, U+21AB   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH LOOP
↱  ↰    U+21B1, U+21B0   UPWARDS ARROW WITH TIP RIGHT/LEFTWARDS
↳  ↲    U+21B3, U+21B2   DOWNWARDS ARROW WITH TIP RIGHT/LEFTWARDS
⇀  ↼    U+21C0, U+21BC   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HARPOON WITH BARB UPWARDS
⇁  ↽    U+21C1, U+21BD   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HARPOON WITH BARB DOWNWARDS
⇉  ⇇    U+21C9, U+21C7   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS PAIRED ARROWS
⇏  ⇍    U+21CF, U+21CD   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS DOUBLE ARROW WITH STROKE
⇒  ⇐    U+21D2, U+21D0   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS DOUBLE ARROW
⇛  ⇚    U+21DB, U+21DA   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIPLE ARROW
⇝  ⇜    U+21DD, U+21DC   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS SQUIGGLE ARROW
⇢  ⇠    U+21E2, U+21E0   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS DASHED ARROW
⇥  ⇤    U+21E5, U+21E4   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW TO BAR
⇨  ⇦    U+21E8, U+21E6   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS WHITE ARROW
⇴  ⬰    U+21F4, U+2B30   RIGHT/LEFT ARROW WITH SMALL CIRCLE
⇶  ⬱    U+21F6, U+2B31   THREE RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROWS
⇸  ⇷    U+21F8, U+21F7   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH VERTICAL STROKE
⇻  ⇺    U+21FB, U+21FA   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH DOUBLE VERTICAL
                         STROKE
⇾  ⇽    U+21FE, U+21FD   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS OPEN-HEADED ARROW
∈  ∋    U+2208, U+220B   ELEMENT OF,  CONTAINS AS MEMBER
∉  ∌    U+2209, U+220C   NOT AN ELEMENT OF,  DOES NOT CONTAIN AS MEMBER
∊  ∍    U+220A, U+220D   SMALL ELEMENT OF,  SMALL CONTAINS AS MEMBER
≤  ≥    U+2264, U+2265   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN OR EQUAL TO
≦  ≧    U+2266, U+2267   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN OVER EQUAL TO
≨  ≩    U+2268, U+2269   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN BUT NOT EQUAL TO
≪  ≫    U+226A, U+226B   MUCH LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN
≮  ≯    U+226E, U+226F   NOT LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN
≰  ≱    U+2270, U+2271   NEITHER LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN NOR EQUAL TO
≲  ≳    U+2272, U+2273   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN OR EQUIVALENT TO
≴  ≵    U+2274, U+2275   NEITHER LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN NOR EQUIVALENT TO
≺  ≻    U+227A, U+227B   PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS
≼  ≽    U+227C, U+227D   PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS OR EQUAL TO
≾  ≿    U+227E, U+227F   PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS OR EQUIVALENT TO
⊀  ⊁    U+2280, U+2281   DOES NOT PRECEDE/SUCCEED
⊂  ⊃    U+2282, U+2283   SUBSET/SUPERSET OF
⊄  ⊅    U+2284, U+2285   NOT A SUBSET/SUPERSET OF
⊆  ⊇    U+2286, U+2287   SUBSET/SUPERSET OF OR EQUAL TO
⊈  ⊉    U+2288, U+2289   NEITHER A SUBSET/SUPERSET OF NOR EQUAL TO
⊊  ⊋    U+228A, U+228B   SUBSET/SUPERSET OF WITH NOT EQUAL TO
⊣  ⊢    U+22A3, U+22A2   LEFT/RIGHT TACK
⊦  ⫞    U+22A6, U+2ADE   ASSERTION,  SHORT LEFT TACK
⊨  ⫤    U+22A8, U+2AE4   TRUE,  VERTICAL BAR DOUBLE LEFT TURNSTILE
⊩  ⫣    U+22A9, U+2AE3   FORCES,  DOUBLE VERTICAL BAR LEFT TURNSTILE
⊰  ⊱    U+22B0, U+22B1   PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS UNDER RELATION
⋐  ⋑    U+22D0, U+22D1   DOUBLE SUBSET/SUPERSET
⋖  ⋗    U+22D6, U+22D7   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN WITH DOT
⋘  ⋙    U+22D8, U+22D9   VERY MUCH LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN
⋜  ⋝    U+22DC, U+22DD   EQUAL TO OR LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN
⋞  ⋟    U+22DE, U+22DF   EQUAL TO OR PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS
⋠  ⋡    U+22E0, U+22E1   DOES NOT PRECEDE/SUCCEED OR EQUAL
⋦  ⋧    U+22E6, U+22E7   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN BUT NOT EQUIVALENT TO
⋨  ⋩    U+22E8, U+22E9   PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS BUT NOT EQUIVALENT TO
⋲  ⋺    U+22F2, U+22FA   ELEMENT OF/CONTAINS WITH LONG HORIZONTAL STROKE
⋳  ⋻    U+22F3, U+22FB   ELEMENT OF/CONTAINS WITH VERTICAL BAR AT END OF
                         HORIZONTAL STROKE
⋴  ⋼    U+22F4, U+22FC   SMALL ELEMENT OF/CONTAINS WITH VERTICAL BAR AT
                         END OF HORIZONTAL STROKE
⋶  ⋽    U+22F6, U+22FD   ELEMENT OF/CONTAINS WITH OVERBAR
⋷  ⋾    U+22F7, U+22FE   SMALL ELEMENT OF/CONTAINS WITH OVERBAR
⌈  ⌉    U+2308, U+2309   LEFT/RIGHT CEILING
⌊  ⌋    U+230A, U+230B   LEFT/RIGHT FLOOR
⌦  ⌫    U+2326, U+232B   ERASE TO THE RIGHT/LEFT
⟨ ⟩   U+2329, U+232A   LEFT/RIGHT-POINTING ANGLE BRACKET
⍈  ⍇    U+2348, U+2347   APL FUNCTIONAL SYMBOL QUAD RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW
⏩ ⏪   U+23E9, U+23EA   BLACK RIGHT/LEFT-POINTING DOUBLE TRIANGLE
⏭  ⏮    U+23ED, U+23EE   BLACK RIGHT/LEFT-POINTING DOUBLE TRIANGLE WITH
                         VERTICAL BAR
☛  ☚    U+261B, U+261A   BLACK RIGHT/LEFT POINTING INDEX
☞  ☜    U+261E, U+261C   WHITE RIGHT/LEFT POINTING INDEX
⚞  ⚟    U+269E, U+269F   THREE LINES CONVERGING RIGHT/LEFT
❨  ❩    U+2768, U+2769   MEDIUM LEFT/RIGHT PARENTHESIS ORNAMENT
❪  ❫    U+276A, U+276B   MEDIUM FLATTENED LEFT/RIGHT PARENTHESIS ORNAMENT
❬  ❭    U+276C, U+276D   MEDIUM LEFT/RIGHT-POINTING ANGLE BRACKET
                         ORNAMENT
❮  ❯    U+276E, U+276F   HEAVY LEFT/RIGHT-POINTING ANGLE QUOTATION MARK
                         ORNAMENT
❰  ❱    U+2770, U+2771   HEAVY LEFT/RIGHT-POINTING ANGLE BRACKET ORNAMENT
❲  ❳    U+2772, U+2773   LIGHT LEFT/RIGHT TORTOISE SHELL BRACKET ORNAMENT
❴  ❵    U+2774, U+2775   MEDIUM LEFT/RIGHT CURLY BRACKET ORNAMENT
⟃  ⟄    U+27C3, U+27C4   OPEN SUBSET/SUPERSET
⟅  ⟆    U+27C5, U+27C6   LEFT/RIGHT S-SHAPED BAG DELIMITER
⟈  ⟉    U+27C8, U+27C9   REVERSE SOLIDUS PRECEDING SUBSET,  SUPERSET
                         PRECEDING SOLIDUS
⟞  ⟝    U+27DE, U+27DD   LONG LEFT/RIGHT TACK
⟦  ⟧    U+27E6, U+27E7   MATHEMATICAL LEFT/RIGHT WHITE SQUARE BRACKET
⟨  ⟩    U+27E8, U+27E9   MATHEMATICAL LEFT/RIGHT ANGLE BRACKET
⟪  ⟫    U+27EA, U+27EB   MATHEMATICAL LEFT/RIGHT DOUBLE ANGLE BRACKET
⟬  ⟭    U+27EC, U+27ED   MATHEMATICAL LEFT/RIGHT WHITE TORTOISE SHELL
                         BRACKET
⟮  ⟯    U+27EE, U+27EF   MATHEMATICAL LEFT/RIGHT FLATTENED PARENTHESIS
⟴  ⬲    U+27F4, U+2B32   RIGHT/LEFT ARROW WITH CIRCLED PLUS
⟶  ⟵    U+27F6, U+27F5   LONG RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW
⟹  ⟸    U+27F9, U+27F8   LONG RIGHT/LEFTWARDS DOUBLE ARROW
⟼  ⟻    U+27FC, U+27FB   LONG RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW FROM BAR
⟾  ⟽    U+27FE, U+27FD   LONG RIGHT/LEFTWARDS DOUBLE ARROW FROM BAR
⟿  ⬳    U+27FF, U+2B33   LONG RIGHT/LEFTWARDS SQUIGGLE ARROW
⤀  ⬴    U+2900, U+2B34   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TWO-HEADED ARROW WITH VERTICAL
                         STROKE
⤁  ⬵    U+2901, U+2B35   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TWO-HEADED ARROW WITH DOUBLE
                         VERTICAL STROKE
⤃  ⤂    U+2903, U+2902   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS DOUBLE ARROW WITH VERTICAL
                         STROKE
⤅  ⬶    U+2905, U+2B36   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TWO-HEADED ARROW FROM BAR
⤇  ⤆    U+2907, U+2906   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS DOUBLE ARROW FROM BAR
⤍  ⤌    U+290D, U+290C   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS DOUBLE DASH ARROW
⤏  ⤎    U+290F, U+290E   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIPLE DASH ARROW
⤐  ⬷    U+2910, U+2B37   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TWO-HEADED TRIPLE DASH ARROW
⤑  ⬸    U+2911, U+2B38   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH DOTTED STEM
⤔  ⬹    U+2914, U+2B39   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH TAIL WITH VERTICAL
                         STROKE
⤕  ⬺    U+2915, U+2B3A   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH TAIL WITH DOUBLE
                         VERTICAL STROKE
⤖  ⬻    U+2916, U+2B3B   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TWO-HEADED ARROW WITH TAIL
⤗  ⬼    U+2917, U+2B3C   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TWO-HEADED ARROW WITH TAIL WITH
                         VERTICAL STROKE
⤘  ⬽    U+2918, U+2B3D   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TWO-HEADED ARROW WITH TAIL WITH
                         DOUBLE VERTICAL STROKE
⤚  ⤙    U+291A, U+2919   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW-TAIL
⤜  ⤛    U+291C, U+291B   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS DOUBLE ARROW-TAIL
⤞  ⤝    U+291E, U+291D   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW TO BLACK DIAMOND
⤠  ⤟    U+2920, U+291F   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW FROM BAR TO BLACK DIAMOND
⤳  ⬿    U+2933, U+2B3F   WAVE ARROW POINTING DIRECTLY RIGHT/LEFT
⤷  ⤶    U+2937, U+2936   ARROW POINTING DOWNWARDS THEN CURVING RIGHT/
                         LEFTWARDS
⥅  ⥆    U+2945, U+2946   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH PLUS BELOW
⥇  ⬾    U+2947, U+2B3E   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW THROUGH X
⥓  ⥒    U+2953, U+2952   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HARPOON WITH BARB UP TO BAR
⥗  ⥖    U+2957, U+2956   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HARPOON WITH BARB DOWN TO BAR
⥛  ⥚    U+295B, U+295A   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HARPOON WITH BARB UP FROM BAR
⥟  ⥞    U+295F, U+295E   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HARPOON WITH BARB DOWN FROM BAR
⥤  ⥢    U+2964, U+2962   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HARPOON WITH BARB UP ABOVE
                         RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HARPOON WITH BARB DOWN
⥬  ⥪    U+296C, U+296A   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HARPOON WITH BARB UP ABOVE LONG
                         DASH
⥭  ⥫    U+296D, U+296B   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HARPOON WITH BARB DOWN BELOW
                         LONG DASH
⥱  ⭀    U+2971, U+2B40   EQUALS SIGN ABOVE RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW
⥲  ⭁    U+2972, U+2B41   TILDE OPERATOR ABOVE RIGHTWARDS ARROW,  REVERSE
                         TILDE OPERATOR ABOVE LEFTWARDS ARROW
⥴  ⭋    U+2974, U+2B4B   RIGHTWARDS ARROW ABOVE TILDE OPERATOR,
                         LEFTWARDS ARROW ABOVE REVERSE TILDE OPERATOR
⥵  ⭂    U+2975, U+2B42   RIGHTWARDS ARROW ABOVE ALMOST EQUAL TO,
                         LEFTWARDS ARROW ABOVE REVERSE ALMOST EQUAL TO
⥹  ⥻    U+2979, U+297B   SUBSET/SUPERSET ABOVE RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW
⦃  ⦄    U+2983, U+2984   LEFT/RIGHT WHITE CURLY BRACKET
⦅  ⦆    U+2985, U+2986   LEFT/RIGHT WHITE PARENTHESIS
⦇  ⦈    U+2987, U+2988   Z NOTATION LEFT/RIGHT IMAGE BRACKET
⦉  ⦊    U+2989, U+298A   Z NOTATION LEFT/RIGHT BINDING BRACKET
⦋  ⦌    U+298B, U+298C   LEFT/RIGHT SQUARE BRACKET WITH UNDERBAR
⦍  ⦐    U+298D, U+2990   LEFT/RIGHT SQUARE BRACKET WITH TICK IN TOP
                         CORNER
⦏  ⦎    U+298F, U+298E   LEFT/RIGHT SQUARE BRACKET WITH TICK IN BOTTOM
                         CORNER
⦑  ⦒    U+2991, U+2992   LEFT/RIGHT ANGLE BRACKET WITH DOT
⦓  ⦔    U+2993, U+2994   LEFT/RIGHT ARC LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN BRACKET
⦕  ⦖    U+2995, U+2996   DOUBLE LEFT/RIGHT ARC GREATER-THAN/LESS-THAN
                         BRACKET
⦗  ⦘    U+2997, U+2998   LEFT/RIGHT BLACK TORTOISE SHELL BRACKET
⦨  ⦩    U+29A8, U+29A9   MEASURED ANGLE WITH OPEN ARM ENDING IN ARROW
                         POINTING UP AND RIGHT/LEFT
⦪  ⦫    U+29AA, U+29AB   MEASURED ANGLE WITH OPEN ARM ENDING IN ARROW
                         POINTING DOWN AND RIGHT/LEFT
⦳  ⦴    U+29B3, U+29B4   EMPTY SET WITH RIGHT/LEFT ARROW ABOVE
⧀  ⧁    U+29C0, U+29C1   CIRCLED LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN
⧘  ⧙    U+29D8, U+29D9   LEFT/RIGHT WIGGLY FENCE
⧚  ⧛    U+29DA, U+29DB   LEFT/RIGHT DOUBLE WIGGLY FENCE
⧼  ⧽    U+29FC, U+29FD   LEFT/RIGHT-POINTING CURVED ANGLE BRACKET
⩹  ⩺    U+2A79, U+2A7A   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN WITH CIRCLE INSIDE
⩻  ⩼    U+2A7B, U+2A7C   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN WITH QUESTION MARK ABOVE
⩽  ⩾    U+2A7D, U+2A7E   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN OR SLANTED EQUAL TO
⩿  ⪀    U+2A7F, U+2A80   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN OR SLANTED EQUAL TO WITH
                         DOT INSIDE
⪁  ⪂    U+2A81, U+2A82   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN OR SLANTED EQUAL TO WITH
                         DOT ABOVE
⪃  ⪄    U+2A83, U+2A84   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN OR SLANTED EQUAL TO WITH
                         DOT ABOVE RIGHT/LEFT
⪅  ⪆    U+2A85, U+2A86   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN OR APPROXIMATE
⪇  ⪈    U+2A87, U+2A88   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN AND SINGLE-LINE NOT
                         EQUAL TO
⪉  ⪊    U+2A89, U+2A8A   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN AND NOT APPROXIMATE
⪍  ⪎    U+2A8D, U+2A8E   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN ABOVE SIMILAR OR EQUAL
⪕  ⪖    U+2A95, U+2A96   SLANTED EQUAL TO OR LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN
⪗  ⪘    U+2A97, U+2A98   SLANTED EQUAL TO OR LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN WITH
                         DOT INSIDE
⪙  ⪚    U+2A99, U+2A9A   DOUBLE-LINE EQUAL TO OR LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN
⪛  ⪜    U+2A9B, U+2A9C   DOUBLE-LINE SLANTED EQUAL TO OR LESS-THAN/
                         GREATER-THAN
⪝  ⪞    U+2A9D, U+2A9E   SIMILAR OR LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN
⪟  ⪠    U+2A9F, U+2AA0   SIMILAR ABOVE LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN ABOVE
                         EQUALS SIGN
⪡  ⪢    U+2AA1, U+2AA2   DOUBLE NESTED LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN
⪦  ⪧    U+2AA6, U+2AA7   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN CLOSED BY CURVE
⪨  ⪩    U+2AA8, U+2AA9   LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN CLOSED BY CURVE ABOVE
                         SLANTED EQUAL
⪪  ⪫    U+2AAA, U+2AAB   SMALLER THAN/LARGER THAN
⪬  ⪭    U+2AAC, U+2AAD   SMALLER THAN/LARGER THAN OR EQUAL TO
⪯  ⪰    U+2AAF, U+2AB0   PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS ABOVE SINGLE-LINE EQUALS SIGN
⪱  ⪲    U+2AB1, U+2AB2   PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS ABOVE SINGLE-LINE NOT EQUAL TO
⪳  ⪴    U+2AB3, U+2AB4   PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS ABOVE EQUALS SIGN
⪵  ⪶    U+2AB5, U+2AB6   PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS ABOVE NOT EQUAL TO
⪷  ⪸    U+2AB7, U+2AB8   PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS ABOVE ALMOST EQUAL TO
⪹  ⪺    U+2AB9, U+2ABA   PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS ABOVE NOT ALMOST EQUAL TO
⪻  ⪼    U+2ABB, U+2ABC   DOUBLE PRECEDES/SUCCEEDS
⪽  ⪾    U+2ABD, U+2ABE   SUBSET/SUPERSET WITH DOT
⪿  ⫀    U+2ABF, U+2AC0   SUBSET/SUPERSET WITH PLUS SIGN BELOW
⫁  ⫂    U+2AC1, U+2AC2   SUBSET/SUPERSET WITH MULTIPLICATION SIGN BELOW
⫃  ⫄    U+2AC3, U+2AC4   SUBSET/SUPERSET OF OR EQUAL TO WITH DOT ABOVE
⫅  ⫆    U+2AC5, U+2AC6   SUBSET/SUPERSET OF ABOVE EQUALS SIGN
⫇  ⫈    U+2AC7, U+2AC8   SUBSET/SUPERSET OF ABOVE TILDE OPERATOR
⫉  ⫊    U+2AC9, U+2ACA   SUBSET/SUPERSET OF ABOVE ALMOST EQUAL TO
⫋  ⫌    U+2ACB, U+2ACC   SUBSET/SUPERSET OF ABOVE NOT EQUAL TO
⫏  ⫐    U+2ACF, U+2AD0   CLOSED SUBSET/SUPERSET
⫑  ⫒    U+2AD1, U+2AD2   CLOSED SUBSET/SUPERSET OR EQUAL TO
⫕  ⫖    U+2AD5, U+2AD6   SUBSET/SUPERSET ABOVE SUBSET/SUPERSET
⫥  ⊫    U+2AE5, U+22AB   DOUBLE VERTICAL BAR DOUBLE LEFT/RIGHT TURNSTILE
⫷  ⫸    U+2AF7, U+2AF8   TRIPLE NESTED LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN
⫹  ⫺    U+2AF9, U+2AFA   DOUBLE-LINE SLANTED LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN OR
                         EQUAL TO
⭆  ⭅    U+2B46, U+2B45   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS QUADRUPLE ARROW
⭇  ⭉    U+2B47, U+2B49   REVERSE TILDE OPERATOR ABOVE RIGHTWARDS ARROW,
                         TILDE OPERATOR ABOVE LEFTWARDS ARROW
⭈  ⭊    U+2B48, U+2B4A   RIGHTWARDS ARROW ABOVE REVERSE ALMOST EQUAL
                         TO,  LEFTWARDS ARROW ABOVE ALMOST EQUAL TO
⭌  ⥳    U+2B4C, U+2973   RIGHTWARDS ARROW ABOVE REVERSE TILDE OPERATOR,
                         LEFTWARDS ARROW ABOVE TILDE OPERATOR
⭢  ⭠    U+2B62, U+2B60   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIANGLE-HEADED ARROW
⭬  ⭪    U+2B6C, U+2B6A   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIANGLE-HEADED DASHED ARROW
⭲  ⭰    U+2B72, U+2B70   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIANGLE-HEADED ARROW TO BAR
⭼  ⭺    U+2B7C, U+2B7A   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIANGLE-HEADED ARROW WITH
                         DOUBLE VERTICAL STROKE
⮆  ⮄    U+2B86, U+2B84   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIANGLE-HEADED PAIRED ARROWS
⮊  ⮈    U+2B8A, U+2B88   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS BLACK CIRCLED WHITE ARROW
⮕  ⬅    U+2B95, U+2B05   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS BLACK ARROW
⮚  ⮘    U+2B9A, U+2B98   THREE-D TOP-LIGHTED RIGHT/LEFTWARDS EQUILATERAL
                         ARROWHEAD
⮞  ⮜    U+2B9E, U+2B9C   BLACK RIGHT/LEFTWARDS EQUILATERAL ARROWHEAD
⮡  ⮠    U+2BA1, U+2BA0   DOWNWARDS TRIANGLE-HEADED ARROW WITH LONG TIP
                         RIGHT/LEFTWARDS
⮣  ⮢    U+2BA3, U+2BA2   UPWARDS TRIANGLE-HEADED ARROW WITH LONG TIP
                         RIGHT/LEFTWARDS
⮩  ⮨    U+2BA9, U+2BA8   BLACK CURVED DOWNWARDS AND RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW
⮫  ⮪    U+2BAB, U+2BAA   BLACK CURVED UPWARDS AND RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW
⮱  ⮰    U+2BB1, U+2BB0   RIBBON ARROW DOWN RIGHT/LEFT
⮳  ⮲    U+2BB3, U+2BB2   RIBBON ARROW UP RIGHT/LEFT
⯮  ⯬    U+2BEE, U+2BEC   RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TWO-HEADED ARROW WITH TRIANGLE
                         ARROWHEADS
⸂  ⸃    U+2E02, U+2E03   LEFT/RIGHT SUBSTITUTION BRACKET
⸃  ⸂    U+2E03, U+2E02   RIGHT/LEFT SUBSTITUTION BRACKET
⸄  ⸅    U+2E04, U+2E05   LEFT/RIGHT DOTTED SUBSTITUTION BRACKET
⸅  ⸄    U+2E05, U+2E04   RIGHT/LEFT DOTTED SUBSTITUTION BRACKET
⸉  ⸊    U+2E09, U+2E0A   LEFT/RIGHT TRANSPOSITION BRACKET
⸊  ⸉    U+2E0A, U+2E09   RIGHT/LEFT TRANSPOSITION BRACKET
⸌  ⸍    U+2E0C, U+2E0D   LEFT/RIGHT RAISED OMISSION BRACKET
⸍  ⸌    U+2E0D, U+2E0C   RIGHT/LEFT RAISED OMISSION BRACKET
⸑  ⸐    U+2E11, U+2E10   REVERSED FORKED PARAGRAPHOS,  FORKED PARAGRAPHOS
⸜  ⸝    U+2E1C, U+2E1D   LEFT/RIGHT LOW PARAPHRASE BRACKET
⸝  ⸜    U+2E1D, U+2E1C   RIGHT/LEFT LOW PARAPHRASE BRACKET
⸠  ⸡    U+2E20, U+2E21   LEFT/RIGHT VERTICAL BAR WITH QUILL
⸡  ⸠    U+2E21, U+2E20   RIGHT/LEFT VERTICAL BAR WITH QUILL
⸢  ⸣    U+2E22, U+2E23   TOP LEFT/RIGHT HALF BRACKET
⸤  ⸥    U+2E24, U+2E25   BOTTOM LEFT/RIGHT HALF BRACKET
⸦  ⸧    U+2E26, U+2E27   LEFT/RIGHT SIDEWAYS U BRACKET
⸨  ⸩    U+2E28, U+2E29   LEFT/RIGHT DOUBLE PARENTHESIS
⸶  ⸷    U+2E36, U+2E37   DAGGER WITH LEFT/RIGHT GUARD
⹂  „    U+2E42, U+201E   DOUBLE LOW-REVERSED-9 QUOTATION MARK,  DOUBLE
                         LOW-9 QUOTATION MARK
⹕  ⹖    U+2E55, U+2E56   LEFT/RIGHT SQUARE BRACKET WITH STROKE
⹗  ⹘    U+2E57, U+2E58   LEFT/RIGHT SQUARE BRACKET WITH DOUBLE STROKE
⹙  ⹚    U+2E59, U+2E5A   TOP HALF LEFT/RIGHT PARENTHESIS
⹛  ⹜    U+2E5B, U+2E5C   BOTTOM HALF LEFT/RIGHT PARENTHESIS
〈 〉   U+3008, U+3009   LEFT/RIGHT ANGLE BRACKET
《 》   U+300A, U+300B   LEFT/RIGHT DOUBLE ANGLE BRACKET
「 」   U+300C, U+300D   LEFT/RIGHT CORNER BRACKET
『 』   U+300E, U+300F   LEFT/RIGHT WHITE CORNER BRACKET
【 】   U+3010, U+3011   LEFT/RIGHT BLACK LENTICULAR BRACKET
〔 〕   U+3014, U+3015   LEFT/RIGHT TORTOISE SHELL BRACKET
〖 〗   U+3016, U+3017   LEFT/RIGHT WHITE LENTICULAR BRACKET
〘 〙   U+3018, U+3019   LEFT/RIGHT WHITE TORTOISE SHELL BRACKET
〚 〛   U+301A, U+301B   LEFT/RIGHT WHITE SQUARE BRACKET
〝 〞   U+301D, U+301E   REVERSED DOUBLE PRIME QUOTATION MARK,  DOUBLE
                         PRIME QUOTATION MARK
꧁  ꧂    U+A9C1, U+A9C2   JAVANESE LEFT/RIGHT RERENGGAN
﴾  ﴿    U+FD3E, U+FD3F   ORNATE LEFT/RIGHT PARENTHESIS
﹙ ﹚   U+FE59, U+FE5A   SMALL LEFT/RIGHT PARENTHESIS
﹛ ﹜   U+FE5B, U+FE5C   SMALL LEFT/RIGHT CURLY BRACKET
﹝ ﹞   U+FE5D, U+FE5E   SMALL LEFT/RIGHT TORTOISE SHELL BRACKET
﹤ ﹥   U+FE64, U+FE65   SMALL LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN SIGN
( )   U+FF08, U+FF09   FULLWIDTH LEFT/RIGHT PARENTHESIS
< >   U+FF1C, U+FF1E   FULLWIDTH LESS-THAN/GREATER-THAN SIGN
[ ]   U+FF3B, U+FF3D   FULLWIDTH LEFT/RIGHT SQUARE BRACKET
{ }   U+FF5B, U+FF5D   FULLWIDTH LEFT/RIGHT CURLY BRACKET
⦅ ⦆   U+FF5F, U+FF60   FULLWIDTH LEFT/RIGHT WHITE PARENTHESIS
「  」    U+FF62, U+FF63   HALFWIDTH LEFT/RIGHT CORNER BRACKET
→  ←    U+FFEB, U+FFE9   HALFWIDTH RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW
𝄃  𝄂    U+1D103, U+1D102 MUSICAL SYMBOL REVERSE FINAL BARLINE,  MUSICAL
                         SYMBOL FINAL BARLINE
𝄆  𝄇    U+1D106, U+1D107 MUSICAL SYMBOL LEFT/RIGHT REPEAT SIGN
👉 👈   U+1F449, U+1F448 WHITE RIGHT/LEFT POINTING BACKHAND INDEX
🔈 🕨    U+1F508, U+1F568 SPEAKER,  RIGHT SPEAKER
🔉 🕩    U+1F509, U+1F569 SPEAKER WITH ONE SOUND WAVE,  RIGHT SPEAKER WITH
                         ONE SOUND WAVE
🔊 🕪    U+1F50A, U+1F56A SPEAKER WITH THREE SOUND WAVES,  RIGHT SPEAKER
                         WITH THREE SOUND WAVES
🕻  🕽    U+1F57B, U+1F57D LEFT/RIGHT HAND TELEPHONE RECEIVER
🖙  🖘    U+1F599, U+1F598 SIDEWAYS WHITE RIGHT/LEFT POINTING INDEX
🖛  🖚    U+1F59B, U+1F59A SIDEWAYS BLACK RIGHT/LEFT POINTING INDEX
🖝  🖜    U+1F59D, U+1F59C BLACK RIGHT/LEFT POINTING BACKHAND INDEX
🗦  🗧    U+1F5E6, U+1F5E7 THREE RAYS LEFT/RIGHT
🠂  🠀    U+1F802, U+1F800 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH SMALL TRIANGLE
                         ARROWHEAD
🠆  🠄    U+1F806, U+1F804 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH MEDIUM TRIANGLE
                         ARROWHEAD
🠊  🠈    U+1F80A, U+1F808 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH LARGE TRIANGLE
                         ARROWHEAD
🠒  🠐    U+1F812, U+1F810 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH SMALL EQUILATERAL
                         ARROWHEAD
🠖  🠔    U+1F816, U+1F814 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH EQUILATERAL ARROWHEAD
🠚  🠘    U+1F81A, U+1F818 HEAVY RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH EQUILATERAL
                         ARROWHEAD
🠞  🠜    U+1F81E, U+1F81C HEAVY RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH LARGE
                         EQUILATERAL ARROWHEAD
🠢  🠠    U+1F822, U+1F820 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIANGLE-HEADED ARROW WITH
                         NARROW SHAFT
🠦  🠤    U+1F826, U+1F824 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIANGLE-HEADED ARROW WITH
                         MEDIUM SHAFT
🠪  🠨    U+1F82A, U+1F828 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIANGLE-HEADED ARROW WITH BOLD
                         SHAFT
🠮  🠬    U+1F82E, U+1F82C RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIANGLE-HEADED ARROW WITH
                         HEAVY SHAFT
🠲  🠰    U+1F832, U+1F830 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIANGLE-HEADED ARROW WITH VERY
                         HEAVY SHAFT
🠶  🠴    U+1F836, U+1F834 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS FINGER-POST ARROW
🠺  🠸    U+1F83A, U+1F838 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS SQUARED ARROW
🠾  🠼    U+1F83E, U+1F83C RIGHT/LEFTWARDS COMPRESSED ARROW
🡂  🡀    U+1F842, U+1F840 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HEAVY COMPRESSED ARROW
🡆  🡄    U+1F846, U+1F844 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HEAVY ARROW
🡒  🡐    U+1F852, U+1F850 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS SANS-SERIF ARROW
🡢  🡠    U+1F862, U+1F860 WIDE-HEADED RIGHT/LEFTWARDS LIGHT BARB ARROW
🡪  🡨    U+1F86A, U+1F868 WIDE-HEADED RIGHT/LEFTWARDS BARB ARROW
🡲  🡰    U+1F872, U+1F870 WIDE-HEADED RIGHT/LEFTWARDS MEDIUM BARB ARROW
🡺  🡸    U+1F87A, U+1F878 WIDE-HEADED RIGHT/LEFTWARDS HEAVY BARB ARROW
🢂  🢀    U+1F882, U+1F880 WIDE-HEADED RIGHT/LEFTWARDS VERY HEAVY BARB
                         ARROW
🢒  🢐    U+1F892, U+1F890 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TRIANGLE ARROWHEAD
🢖  🢔    U+1F896, U+1F894 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS WHITE ARROW WITHIN TRIANGLE
                         ARROWHEAD
🢚  🢘    U+1F89A, U+1F898 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS ARROW WITH NOTCHED TAIL
🢡  🢠    U+1F8A1, U+1F8A0 RIGHTWARDS BOTTOM SHADED WHITE ARROW,
                         LEFTWARDS BOTTOM-SHADED WHITE ARROW
🢣  🢢    U+1F8A3, U+1F8A2 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS TOP SHADED WHITE ARROW
🢥  🢦    U+1F8A5, U+1F8A6 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS RIGHT-SHADED WHITE ARROW
🢧  🢤    U+1F8A7, U+1F8A4 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS LEFT-SHADED WHITE ARROW
🢩  🢨    U+1F8A9, U+1F8A8 RIGHT/LEFTWARDS BACK-TILTED SHADOWED WHITE ARROW
🢫  🢪    U+1F8AB, U+1F8AA RIGHT/LEFTWARDS FRONT-TILTED SHADOWED WHITE
                         ARROW

FEATURE BUNDLES

It's possible to load multiple features together, using a feature bundle. The name of a feature bundle is prefixed with a colon, to distinguish it from an actual feature.

use feature ":5.10";

The following feature bundles are available:

bundle    features included
--------- -----------------
:default  indirect multidimensional
          bareword_filehandles

:5.10     bareword_filehandles indirect
          multidimensional say state switch

:5.12     bareword_filehandles indirect
          multidimensional say state switch
          unicode_strings

:5.14     bareword_filehandles indirect
          multidimensional say state switch
          unicode_strings

:5.16     bareword_filehandles current_sub evalbytes
          fc indirect multidimensional say state
          switch unicode_eval unicode_strings

:5.18     bareword_filehandles current_sub evalbytes
          fc indirect multidimensional say state
          switch unicode_eval unicode_strings

:5.20     bareword_filehandles current_sub evalbytes
          fc indirect multidimensional say state
          switch unicode_eval unicode_strings

:5.22     bareword_filehandles current_sub evalbytes
          fc indirect multidimensional say state
          switch unicode_eval unicode_strings

:5.24     bareword_filehandles current_sub evalbytes
          fc indirect multidimensional postderef_qq
          say state switch unicode_eval
          unicode_strings

:5.26     bareword_filehandles current_sub evalbytes
          fc indirect multidimensional postderef_qq
          say state switch unicode_eval
          unicode_strings

:5.28     bareword_filehandles bitwise current_sub
          evalbytes fc indirect multidimensional
          postderef_qq say state switch unicode_eval
          unicode_strings

:5.30     bareword_filehandles bitwise current_sub
          evalbytes fc indirect multidimensional
          postderef_qq say state switch unicode_eval
          unicode_strings

:5.32     bareword_filehandles bitwise current_sub
          evalbytes fc indirect multidimensional
          postderef_qq say state switch unicode_eval
          unicode_strings

:5.34     bareword_filehandles bitwise current_sub
          evalbytes fc indirect multidimensional
          postderef_qq say state switch unicode_eval
          unicode_strings

:5.36     bareword_filehandles bitwise current_sub
          evalbytes fc isa postderef_qq say signatures
          state unicode_eval unicode_strings

:5.38     bitwise current_sub evalbytes fc isa
          postderef_qq say signatures state
          unicode_eval unicode_strings

The :default bundle represents the feature set that is enabled before any use feature or no feature declaration.

Specifying sub-versions such as the 0 in 5.14.0 in feature bundles has no effect. Feature bundles are guaranteed to be the same for all sub-versions.

use feature ":5.14.0";    # same as ":5.14"
use feature ":5.14.1";    # same as ":5.14"

IMPLICIT LOADING

Instead of loading feature bundles by name, it is easier to let Perl do implicit loading of a feature bundle for you.

There are two ways to load the feature pragma implicitly:

CHECKING FEATURES

feature provides some simple APIs to check which features are enabled.

These functions cannot be imported and must be called by their fully qualified names. If you don't otherwise need to set a feature you will need to ensure feature is loaded with:

use feature ();
feature_enabled($feature)
feature_enabled($feature, $depth)
package MyStandardEnforcer;
use feature ();
use Carp "croak";
sub import {
  croak "disable indirect!" if feature::feature_enabled("indirect");
}

Test whether a named feature is enabled at a given level in the call stack, returning a true value if it is. $depth defaults to 1, which checks the scope that called the scope calling feature::feature_enabled().

croaks for an unknown feature name.

features_enabled()
features_enabled($depth)
package ReportEnabledFeatures;
use feature "say";
sub import {
  say STDERR join " ", feature::features_enabled();
}

Returns a list of the features enabled at a given level in the call stack. $depth defaults to 1, which checks the scope that called the scope calling feature::features_enabled().

feature_bundle()
feature_bundle($depth)

Returns the feature bundle, if any, selected at a given level in the call stack. $depth defaults to 1, which checks the scope that called the scope calling feature::feature_bundle().

Returns an undefined value if no feature bundle is selected in the scope.

The bundle name returned will be for the earliest bundle matching the selected bundle, so:

use feature ();
use v5.12;
BEGIN { print feature::feature_bundle(0); }

will print 5.11.

This returns internal state, at this point use v5.12; sets the feature bundle, but use feature ":5.12"; does not set the feature bundle. This may change in a future release of perl.